Gluten-Free n’ Vegan Tips For Fueling Your Body

Here is a useful guide to help those of you who are Gluten-Free and/or Vegan.  As we all know, I am Gluten-Intolerant, therefore I enjoy consuming all of these foods in my meals and snacks throughout the day.

I hope this guide is helpful for those of you new to the gluten-free world and hope this helps you navigate through your farmers markets and produce aisles of your food store.

Go ahead and dive into these delicious, fresh, ‘clean’ foods knowing that they are safe and good for you and your body…

Carbohydrates- Essential for energy. Reach for complex carbohydrates instead of simple carbs such as sugars, white flours and processed grains that are void of vitamins and minerals.

  • Gluten-Free Pasta (Corn or Gluten-Free Flour Based)
  • Gluten-Free Cereals
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Gluten-Free Oats
  • Gluten-Free Breads
  • Whole Grain Gluten-Free Rice

Fiber- Vital for health: keeps bowels healthy, lowers cholesterol and regulates appetite.

  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains

Fats– Essential for brain and nerve functions.  Look to get Omega 3 fatty acids as often as possible.  Olive oil is best used for cooking.  Be sure to avoid hydrogenated fats and trans fats.  Keep your oils fresh by storing them in a dark, cool place and never re-use oil.

  • Flaxseed oil
  • Hempseed oil
  • Grapeseed oil
  • Olive oil
  • Avocados
  • Nuts (especially hazelnuts and almonds)

Protein-Used for repair of body tissues and growth for enzymes and hormones.  Protein needs are met by a varied, balanced diet so be sure to get proteins from many different sources.

  • Tofu
  • Beansprouts
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Nut/Seed Milk (almond, hemp, etc.)
  • Soy Milk
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Quinoa, Buckwheat, Brown Rice)
  • Nuts
  • Hummus

Vitamins

Vitamin A– Also known as beta carotene, is a powerful anti-oxidant that supports sight, bone and teeth growth and tissue repair.  Be sure to reach for the brightly colored fruits and veggies!

  • Carrots
  • Red and Yellow Bell Peppers
  • Watercress
  • Spinach
  • Mango
  • Dried Apricots
  • Tomatoes
  • Green Leafy Vegetables

B Vitamins– Important for using fats and protein as well as energy.  Also key for cell grown and your nervous system. This group is made up of B1-Thiamin, B2-Riboflavin, B3-Niacin, B6-Pyridoxin and B-12 (see below)

  • Mushrooms
  • Nuts
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Quinoa, Buckwheat, Brown or Wild Rice)
  • Avocado
  • Beansprouts
  • Oranges
  • Bananas
  • Nutritional Yeast
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Green Leafy Veggies (I love Kale)

B12-Used in nerve formation and cell production.  Anemia can result in B12 deficiency.

  • Yeast Extract
  • Gluten-Free Fortified Cereals
  • Gluten-Free Fortified Nut Milks

Vitamin C-Fights infections and heals wounds. An important antioxidant in your everyday lifestyle.  It is important to note that Vitamin C is easily destroyed by heat, light and storage.

  • Broccoli
  • Parsley
  • Potatoes
  • Green Leafy Veggies
  • Oranges
  • Orange Juice
  • Blackcurrants
  • Kiwi
  • Mango

Vitamin D- Our Sunshine…Needed for calcium use.  Helps form healthy bones and teeth.  Met through a few minutes of sunshine on your skin. D2 is animal free.

  • Fortified Gluten-Free Cereals
  • Fortified Nut/Seed Milks
  • Soy Milk

Vitamin E-Antioxidant used to protect against disease.  Helps with tissue healing and skin health.

  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Buckwheat, Brown Rice, Wild Rice, Quinoa)
  • Tomatoes
  • Olive Oil
  • Avocados
  • Carrots
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Apples

Vitamin K– Fights infection Used for energy usage.  Helps with blood clotting and healthy bones.

  • Lentils
  • Peas
  • Lettuce
  • Kombu Sea Vegetables
  • Broccoli
  • Green Leafy Vegetables

Minerals

Iron– Used in production of red blood cells and transportation of oxygen.

  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Tofu
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Figs
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Green Leafy Vegetables
  • Cabbage
  • Pumpkin Seeds

Calcium- Supports teeth, bones and muscles.  Also supports hormones and blood clotting.

  • Almonds
  • Soy Milk
  • Tofu
  • Green Leafy Vegetables
  • broccoli
  • Turnips

Zinc-Important for a strong, healthy immune system and wound healing.

  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Buckwheat, Rice, Quinoa)
  • Almonds
  • Sesame Seeds
  • Lentils
  • Tofu
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Green Leafy Vegetables

Iodine-Important for metabolism and healthy functioning of thyroid gland.  iodine in vegetables depends on the soil.  Seaweeds are the best sources of iodine, especially kelp, which is also known as kombu.

  • Kombu/Kelp Sea Vegetables
  • Green Leafy Vegetables
  • Asparagus

Magnesium– Needed for bone strength, nerve and muscle function.

  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Apricots
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Apples
  • Soya Beans
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Quinoa, Rice, Buckwheat)
  • Green Leafy Vegetables

Selenium, Potassium and Phosphorous– Selenium is an antioxidant that fights diseases.  Potassium helps with blood pressure and calcium helps with balance.

  • Tomatoes
  • Bananas
  • Strawberries
  • Brazil Nuts
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Rice, Buckwheat, Quinoa)
  • Chick Peas
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Nutritional Yeast
  • Many other fruits and vegetables

Trace Elements- Fluorine, Copper, Chromium, Molybdenum and Manganese support bones, teeth, skin, hair and red blood cells. Vital for fighting against diseases.

  • Seaweeds
  • Potatoes
  • Almonds
  • Bananas
  • Gluten-Free Whole Grains (Quinoa, Buckwheat, Brown Rice)
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Green Leafy Vegetables

And, be sure to check out my Shop…I just added many new gluten-free and vegan products as well as fabulous kitchen tools for all your healthy cooking and baking needs.

Enjoy!

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Fiber: The Real Deal vs. The Imposters

While, browsing the isles of the food store recently, I’ve come across numerous products touting ‘Great Source of Fiber’, however, many food companies are attempting to fool consumers such as you and I about the fiber in their products.


Start by taking a look at your favorite products, I’m sure you’ll be surprised to see a whole slew of ingredients such as modified food starch and other additives.  And what will you not see? Well, many of these products do Not list whole grains–therefore they’re serving up processed junk that has been stripped of its nutritional value and fiber content.  Many of my clients face stomach discomfort and GI problems, including myself, when these additives are consumed.

When reading the ingredient list on a food package, be sure to recognize fiber impostors such as inulin, modified starch, maltodextrin and polydextrose and understand that if the packing is touting ‘Fiberific” and these ingredients are listed…it’s time to put the product back on the shelf and reach for a whole grain product with ‘real’ fiber.

These fake fibers that I listed above do not provide us with the health benefits that we get from real fiber in fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains.  Be sure to watch out for fiber fortified products from brands such as Fiber One, Splenda, Post and General Mills cereals, crackers and desserts.

Be aware of the false advertising on packages of yogurts, cookies, ice creams, diet drinks and brownies.  These foods contain polydextrose, which I mentioned above and is synthesized from glucose and sorbitol, a low-calorie carbohydrate.  It’s one of the many new fiber imposters along with inulin and maltodextrin that is showing up in baked goods and dairy products that previously had very little or no fiber.  Sadly enough, the FDA  allows manufacturers to add polydextrose to more products than previously permitted, allowing food companies to entice consumers such as you and I to buy the ‘good tasting’ fiber foods.  These fiber additives serve two purposes-they can be used as bulking agents to make reduced-calorie foods taste yummy such as fat-free ice cream and pudding and they appeal to consumers by appearing on the Nutrition Facts as ‘dietary fiber’.  Don’t be fooled!

I encourage you to steer clear of these fiber impostors which make us believe that fiber ‘tastes good’ unlike the cardboard taste that many fiber rich products have.  Transitioning your family to increase their fiber content can be a struggle, however, do not let these processed foods become a part of your daily fiber intake.  Try to reach for fruits, veggies, whole grains and legumes.  Make sure your fiber is coming from oat bran, whole wheat, beans, peas, prunes, almonds and other plans as these foods  naturally contain fiber.

As we all know from my previous post on Fiber, there are two forms.  Insoluble, which forms bulk and regulates acidity in your stomach and Soluble, which helps regulate cholesterol and blood sugar.

Insoluble is found in foods such as whole wheat products, quinoa, brown rice, bran, fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds.

Soluble is found in foods such as oats, barley, rye, potatoes, fruits, veggies, dried fruits and legumes.

So, stick to the basics and don’t let your food get too complicated.  If grandma wouldn’t recognize it…put it back on the shelf and head to the perimeter of the food store where you will find fresh fruits and veggies with ‘Real Fiber’.

Lucious Leafy Greens

greens

Many of my clients considered ‘leafy green veggies’ unappetizing before they came to me for counseling.  The first thing that came to their minds when I mentioned ‘leafy green veggies’ was “Well, I eat Iceberg Lettuce”! O boy, I thought…we’ve got some work to do and this is going to be fun.  This is what I love about being a Nutritionist.  I truly love making a difference in the way my clients eat and make them realize that this pale lettuce, once so ubiquitous in restaurant salads, does not have the power-packed goodness of other delicious greens.

Before my clients came to me for counseling, they either forgot about these nutrient-rich, flavorful foods or got scared off by the idea of preparing them.

Learning to cook and eat greens is essential for creating lasting health.  It is a simple, easy way to boost your daily diet.  The next time you are at the farmers market or in your local food store, be sure to add some of the following greens to your shopping list: Arugula, Bok Choy, Broccoli Rabe, Cabbage, Collards, Chicory, Dandelion, Escarole, Kale, Swiss Chard, Spinach, Watercress and many other varieties of lettuce.

Leafy green veggies help strengthen our respiratory and circulatory systems.  They are high in magnesium, calcium, iron, potassium, phosphorus, zinc and vitamins A, C, E and K.

Leafy green veggies are packed with folic acid, chlorophyll, fiber and many other micronutrients and phytochemicals.  Moreover, they help with blood purification, cancer prevention, improving circulation, strengthening your immune system and improving gall bladder, kidney and live function.  They are also a great ally in the Fall when cold season begins because greens can help clear congestion and reduce mucus.

Surprisingly, greens are not as complicated as they may appear  Try a variety of cooking methods such as boiling, sauteing in olive oil, steaming, blanching, roasting or chopping up for salads and snacks.  Chopping raw veggies for salads and snacks takes only a few minutes to rinse and prepare.  Cooking greens takes a couple of minutes of prep time and about two minutes of cooking time.  You can experiment with cooking your greens with seeds, nuts, beans, butter, tofu, seital, tempeh, chicken, turkey, fish, ground meat, eggs, etc.  Green veggies are easy to add to homemade or prepared soups or stews right before serving.

Try to get into the habit of adding these green veggies to your diet as often as possible.  While veggies are the scarcest food in the American diet, leafy green veggies area is lacking most of all.

Give some of these green leafy veggies a try and see how you feel!  Let me know what you think about the different flavors and textures of these delicious greens…I’m interested to hear!

Uproot from the Green Basics

While everyday veggies such as broccoli and spinach are great for your health, be adventurous and try these other dark greens that pack a flavorful and nutrient-dense punch.

  • Kale- This leafy green is easy to grow and thrives in cold temps.  The beautiful leaves provide an earthy flavor and excellent nutritional value.  I love making ‘kale wraps’ where I wrap kale leaves around my fish and chicken for a fun finger food!
  • Collard Greens- A staple of traditional Southern cooking, this nutritional powerhouse provides vitamins A, C, calcium, iron and magnesium.  Collard greens are delicious to bake with and I love adding collards to my baked fish recipes.
  • Bok Choy- This veggie has a light, sweet flavor and a crisp texture.  Toss some bok choy into stir-fries, Asian dishes or soups.
  • Escarole- This curly Italian green has a bitter taste.  As you remove the leaves, you will experience different degrees of flavor! As the leaves are peeled back, they continue to lighten in shade and bitterness.

10 Healthy New Years Resolutions

As 2009 rolls to an end, too many of us are still eating too much cholesterol, sodium, sugar and unhealthy fats.  We’ve made resolutions each year, but daily stressors and our constant time-crunch lifestyles lead to mindless and unhealthy eating.  Here are ten simple steps to a healthier diet and lifestyle for 2010, so cross off your list of excuses and start January on the right foot.  Healthy diets don’t require a major overhaul, just a few changes here and there is all you need.

Don’t Cut Out, Simply Add In

Instead of depriving yourself of the foods you love, start slowly by adding in healthy, wholesome foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables at each meal.  Avoiding the foods you cannot live without will only set you up for disaster.  Moderation is key to enjoying some unhealthy foods, so don’t beat yourself up for savoring sweets, just be sure to keep yourself in check throughout the rest of the day.

Watch Where Your Calories Are Coming From

If you’re eating a white bagel for breakfast, a smear of Jiff on Wonder bread for lunch and a frozen entrée for dinner, it’s a smart choice to re-consider the source of these processed foods.  Aim to eat as close to the natural source as possible and revamp your pantry with whole grains, fruits and vegetables.  For instance, opt for a whole grain bagel with lox, almond butter on whole wheat bread for lunch and a tofu stir fry for dinner.  You’ll be amazed at the surge in energy these simple swaps will make in your daily life.

Good Carbs vs. Bad Carbs

Hop off the Lo-Carb bandwagon, which phased out years ago; by now you should know healthy carbs do exist.   Enjoy nutrient-rich whole grains, fruits and vegetables, which contain complex carbs and fiber to keep you satiated longer than the nutrient-void simple carbs found in candy, soda, white bread products and juices.  Simple carbs are nothing but empty calories and will leave you unsatisfied with a blood sugar surge and crash, therefore opt for your whole grain friends in lieu of their white counterparts.

Enjoy Heart-Healthy Fats

All fats are not created equal.  Forgo the fat phobia and enjoy healthy unsaturated fats from oils, fish, seeds and nuts in moderation.  Steer clear of saturated fats found in whole milk, meat and cheese.  Make an effort to scan nutrition labels for trans fats, which are unhealthy and found in many products containing hydrogenated oils.  Moreover, limit your intake of full fat dairy and red meat; opt for skim milk or unsweetened soy milk in your morning cereal and swap ground chicken in place of beef in your evening tacos.

Increase your Fiber

Americans typically don’t get enough fiber in their diets, therefore make it a ‘Must’ for 2010 to increase your fiber intake with whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa and buckwheat.  You get more fiber, vitamin E, B6, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese and potassium in whole wheat than in refined ‘enriched’ white flour.  Moreover, toss in fruits, beans and vegetables to your morning omelet, afternoon salad and evening chili to reap the heart-healthy benefits of fiber.  Get creative and opt for a breakfast parfait, whole wheat zucchini bread, hummus with vegetables or bean burgers.

Up Your Water Intake

It’s quite easy and free.  Keep bottled water with you all day long; one at your work desk, another in your kitchen fridge and yet another along your bedside to give your body a fluid boost and help flush out toxins.  Opt for a glass of water with fresh mint, cucumber slices, oranges or limes, which will give your taste buds a refreshing treat without the calories and sugar of soda or juice.  Avoid sodas and sugar-laden juices by slowly transitioning to a mixture of seltzer and freshly squeezed orange juice.

Create A Rainbow

Vary the rainbow of produce in your meals; try adding a new fruit and vegetable to your meals each week.  Toss an apple in your brown bag or whip up a fruit smoothie for breakfast.  When creating dinner, opt for topping your fish or chicken with vegetable and fruit purees.  Keep handy bags of frozen fruit and vegetables in the freezer and create ready-to eat crudités in your fridge.  Need an emergency snack to keep in your gym bag? Why not create a mixture of dried apples, apricots, pears and cherries? Dried fruits are a tasty way to satisfy your sweet craving and add to your fiber quota for the day.

Nix Mindless Munchies

Keep yourself busy with a mint or a piece of gum.  Moreover, make a habit of brushing your teeth after each meal.  After your meal, enjoy a hot herbal tea or hot water with lemon while you digest your food and give your brain enough time to register that you are full.  Take a walk, call a friend or journal; make a list of things to do when you are ‘bored’ and find yourself mindlessly devouring the pantry.  Post this list on your fridge and refer to it each time you find yourself reaching for the pint of Breyer’s.

Forgo Temptations

Leave the chips, cookies and candy in the food store, not in your pantry.  Unfortunately these tasty treats seem to creep into our kitchens and the outcome is never enjoyable.  Instead of depriving yourself of sweets, think about what you are craving and what would satisfy your need for sweetness.  Perhaps it’s a cup of hot coco with skim milk, cinnamon and coco powder, or an apple dipped into agave nectar and sprinkled with unsweetened coconut.  If you are a chocolate fan, enjoy a square of rich dark chocolate or a few raw cacao nibs to cure your sweet tooth.

Enjoy Your Food

Create an eye-appeasing dish and sit down in an enjoyable environment while you dine.  Many people eat while standing up and end up inhaling food out of the fridge.  Turn away from the computer at lunch and savor your food, turn off the television at night and focus on your food presentation.  Taking the time to prepare a beautiful dish is the name of the game and easier to do than you think.  The only way a healthy diet will work is if you enjoy the foods you are eating so be sure to savor each bite of your meal and concentrate on your hunger and satiety levels before reaching for seconds.

In The News…

General Mills Launches Liveglutenfreely.com

General Mills To Reduce Sugar in Cereals

Pumpkin Bran Cookies

pu

Earlier this week I was in the mood for some serious pumpkin…it must be the fall foliage and autumn breeze that spark my yearning for harvest foods.  These are the days when Central Park is remarkably beautiful; the leaves turning beautiful shades of auburn and rust…reminds me of pumpkins and produce-packed cornucopias.  It’s hard to believe Thanksgiving is next month, although we still have time to enjoy these October days I’m eager to whip up new tasty seasonal recipes.  And what better ingredient to use than good ‘ol pumpkin?

For this particular recipe I used canned pumpkin, which can easily be found in your food store.  Be sure not to purchase ‘Pumpkin Pie Mix’ because the can looks quite similar to regular ‘Pumpkin’.  I always reach for Libby’s canned pumpkin as it has a delectable taste and is incredibly delicious eaten directly out of the can (Yes, you caught me…I have been known to scoop a few spoonfuls of Libby’s right into my mouth).  In this case, try not to eat all of the pumpkin as you’ll need 1/3 cup for the recipe.  I do recommend, however, purchasing another can of Libby’s pumpkin as it is incredibly inexpensive and is wonderful when mixed with a dollop of Greek yogurt and cinnamon for a tasty treat.

I have yet to test this recipe with fresh pumpkin, however, I will be experimenting soon and I’ll be sure to fill you in on the recipe.  For this particular case, canned pumpkin is a perfect option for a quick and easy way to create these healthy treats.  When I’m short on time, but desire flavor I reach for canned pumpkin and it always does the trick.

As for the bran crumbs, they can also be found in your food store…just take a peak down the baking aisle and you’ll be amazed to see numerous boxes, all of which are perfect suited for this delectable recipe. Bran crumbs are a fantastic way to enrich your recipes with a hearty crunch and a dose of heart-healthy fiber.

Not only are these cookies incredibly tasty, but they’re chock full of fiber and pack scores of beta carotene, as well.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seeds
  • 1/3 cup canned pumpkin
  • 1 egg (or egg substitute)
  • 1/2 cup rice milk
  • 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2/3 cup butter (or butter substitute), melted
  • 2 cups bran crumbs or (stale bread mashed into crumbs)
  • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp. dried basil

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Sift together dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  • Combine wet ingredients, then add to dry mixture.
  • Slowly add melted butter and bran crumbs; mix well until it forms a cookie dough consistency.
  • Drop teaspoon sized spoonfuls of cookie dough onto ungreased cookie sheets.
  • Bake for 10-12 minutes or until done.

There are ways to enjoy these fiber-ific pumpkin cookies.  Here are some of my favorites:

  • Pumpkin Cookies crumbled and sprinkled atop morning oatmeal, Greek yogurt and fruit parfait, applesauce or whipped banana pudding.
  • Frozen Greek yogurt sandwiched between 2 Pumpkin Cookies, then rolled in chopped nuts to make ‘Flying Saucers’.
  • Add soft baked Pumpkin Cookies (cut into quarters) to your trail mix or popcorn for a harvest taste.

What is your favorite way to enjoy fiber-rich cookies?

Pumpkin Bread Pudding

Continuing with my fall harvest theme, I have created a delectable Pumpkin Bread Pudding that will knock your socks off, leaving your taste buds yearning for more.  I was excited to use a fresh loaf of Nature’s Pride Soft 100% Whole Wheat bread, which has an incredible consistency and is perfectly suited for bread pudding.  Thanks to the pumpkin, whole wheat and ground flax, this tasty treat packs a healthy dose of beta carotene, whole grains and fiber.

pumpkin

Ingredients

  • 2 egg yolks, slightly beaten
  • 1 can can canned pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 5 slices of Nature’s Pride Soft 100% Whole Wheat bread, cut into cube-like pieces
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts, finely chopped in food processor
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries, chopped
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • Dash of sea salt
  • Plain Greek yogurt, for topping
  • Ground flax seeds, for topping
  • Handful of fresh mint, for topping

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  • In a large bowl, combine egg yolks, pumpkin, brown sugar, balsamic vinegar, cinnamon and nutmeg.  Slowly add in milk; mix well.
  • Fold in Nature’s Path Soft 100% Whole Wheat bread cube piece, chopped macadamia nuts and dried cherries.
  • In a small bowl, beat egg whites until peaks form.
  • Slowly fold egg whites into the bread mixture.
  • Transfer into a baking dish.
  • Bake for 45 minutes or until an inserted knife comes out clean.
  • Serve warm with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt, fresh mint and a sprinkle of ground flax seeds.
  • Enjoy.

Pear n’ Sage Turkey Burgers with Orange Yogurt Spread

Gotta love the fiber in the fresh pears and flax seed, as well as the antioxidants in the orange and sage…these tasty turkey burgers pair perfectly with my yummy yogurt spread. The addition of freshly squeezed juice from an orange adds a juicy touch to the burgers while the zest adds a sweet touch to the yogurt spread.

tureky bbb

Pear n’ Sage Turkey Burgers

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe pear, finely chopped
  • 1/2 lb. lean ground turkey
  • 1 Tbsp. ground flax seed
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh sage, chopped
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • Juice of 1/2 orange
  • Dash of Nu-Salt and pepper
  • Toppings: Fresh spinach, Fresh tomatoes
  • 4 Gluten Free/ Whole Grain buns

Orange Yogurt Spread

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Greek plain yogurt
  • 2 Tbsp. dried basil
  • Dash of Nu-Salt and pepper
  • Zest of 1/2 orange

Directions

  • Preheat grill to medium-high heat.
  • In a large bowl, combine turkey, sage, pear, flax, cranberries, juice from orange, Nu-Salt and pepper.  Mix well with hands and mold into 4 patties.
  • In a small bowl, combine all yogurt spread ingredients.  Mix well.
  • Grill patties for 4-5 minutes per side or until fully cooked.
  • Toast buns and spread each side with the yogurt mixture.
  • Place burger on the bun and top with spinach and tomato.
  • Enjoy!